Patient Care

Comprehensive Care for Disorders of the Brain, Spine, and Nervous Systems.

What We Treat

  • Back Pain
    • ­Cervical or neck pain
    • ­Lumbago or low back pain
    • ­Sacroiliac joint pain
  • Spine Disorders
    • ­Spondylosis and arthritis
    • ­Degenerative disc disease
    • ­Spinal stenosis
  • Cancer Pain
    • ­Disease-related pain
    • ­Treatment-related pain
    • ­Post chemotherapy pain
  • Neuropathy or Nerve Pain
    • ­Tingling or numbness
    • ­Chronic pain caused by injury, disease, or trauma
  • Brain and Cranial Conditions
    • ­Chiari malformation
    • ­Hydrocephalus
    • ­Hemorrhage
  • Brain Tumors

    Our surgeons have expertise in the diagnosis and surgical management of all types of brain and spinal tumors, including gliomas, metastases, colloid cysts, and intraventricular tumors. To learn more, visit our Lexington Medical Center Brain Tumor Program website.

Surgical Options

With extensive experience performing brain and spine surgery for degenerative conditions, trauma and cancer, the skilled surgeons at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute utilize both open and minimally-invasive techniques to achieve the best possible outcomes.

 

  • Brain Surgery
    For more information about Brain Surgery for treatment of tumors, visit the Lexington Medical Center Brain Tumor website to learn more about our interdisciplinary team and customized approach to diagnosing and treating brain tumors.

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    • Stereotactic Radiosurgery – a non-invasive procedure using TrueBeam that administers highly-focused radiation therapy in order to treat tumors and other brain abnormalities.
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    • Minimally Invasive Port Surgery for Brain Tumors – a minimally-invasive technique for removing deep brain tumors using an endoscope, minimizing trauma to the brain and surrounding nerve tissue.
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    • Shunt Implantation – a procedure to divert cerebrospinal fluid into another body cavity to treat hydrocephalus and other spinal fluid circulation disorders.
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    • Craniotomy – a surgery done to remove tumors or abnormal brain tissue, clip off an aneurysm, or drain blood or fluid from an infection.
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    • Biopsy – a diagnostic procedure done to collect a small amount of brain tissue or tumor to be examined under a microscope.­
  • Corpectomy

    A surgery performed to treat bone spurs that stick out from the edges of normal bone and cause pain as they make contact with nerves and other bones. In this surgery, the small portion of the bony section causing pain is removed.

    • ­Cervical Corpectomy
    • ­Lumbar Corpectomy
  • Laminectomy

    A decompression surgery where the ligament that runs along the back side of the spine is cut in order to relieve pressure. This surgery can also be performed to gain access to a herniated or ruptured disc in the spine, remove bone spurs known as osteophytes, to address nerve damage, or remove a tumor from the spine.

    • ­Cervical Laminectomy
    • ­Lumbar Laminectomy
  • Discectomy

    A surgery that can be done at any level of the spine that relieves pressure caused by a herniated or ruptured disc. Often patients have this surgery to address symptoms such as pain, numbness, and weakness.

    • ­Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) – a minimally-invasive surgery where the damaged disc is removed and a bone graft is inserted to fill the open disc space
    • ­Lumbar Microdiscectomy – A minimally-invasive version of the surgery that removes part of the lumbar disc using a laser or suction through a small incision.
  • Spinal Fusion

    A surgery that stabilizes the spine by fusing the weak vertebrae with healthy bone and addresses spinal instability associated with degenerative disc disease, scoliosis, or other problems with spinal alignment. Often a fusion requires hardware like metal rods, plates, or screws for support.

    • ­Lumbar Interbody Fusion

      Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF)
      Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF)
      Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)
      Direct Lateral Interbody Fusion (DLIF)

    • ­Occipital-Cervical Fusion
  • Vertebroplasty/Kyphoplasty

    A procedure done to treat compression fractures in the spine caused by injury or osteoporosis.

    • ­Vertebroplasty – a procedure where bone cement is inserted into the spinal fracture through a long, hollow needle to support the broken vertebrae
    • ­Kyphoplasty – a procedure where a balloon is inserted and inflated to lift the compressed vertebrae back to normal height and bone cement is then inserted into the space, providing strength and support
  • Cervical Arthroplasty

    Also known as cervical disc replacement, cervical arthroplasty is a type of procedure that involves replacing a damaged disc with an artificial disc to treat symptoms of degenerative disc disease or unresolved cervical disc herniation.

Non-Surgical Options

For patients who suffer from unresponsive chronic back pain, the skilled specialists at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute offer customized, non-invasive options to reduce pain and regain daily function with little to no down time. Our interdisciplinary team includes interventional pain management physicians as well as physiatrists and physical therapists.

 

  • Injection Therapy
    What is it?
    We inject a steroid or other pain-relieving medication directly into the source of pain to reduce inflammation and numb the pain. The physician will mark the correct level to be injected and use advanced imaging to take live pictures of your spine in order to guide the needle to the right spot. 

    What should I expect?

    The procedure itself should take about 10 minutes. However, there can be preparations prior to the procedure including dressing into a gown and collecting vitals and pain levels. After the procedure, you may need a driver to ensure your safety. Our dedicated scheduling staff will provide you with everything you need to know in order to be prepared the day of.

    Where does it take place?

    The procedure conveniently takes place in our in-office procedure suite located inside Lexington Medical Park 3. However, if advanced anesthesia is required due to certain health conditions, we may schedule you at the Ambulatory Surgery Center in Lexington. 
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    Epidural Steroid Injections
    These injections can be given at any level of the spine – cervical, thoracic, lumbar, or sacral. A mixture of steroids and numbing medicine will be injected into the epidural space, which is the space surrounding the spinal cord.
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    Facet Joint Injections

    A mixture of steroids and numbing medicine will be injected into one of the facet joints, which are the moveable joints on either side of your spine. When the facet joints swell, it causes pressure and pain in the surrounding nerves. This injection is intended to reduce both the pain and swelling.
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    Intramuscular or Trigger Point Injections
    Intramuscular injections, or trigger point injections, are intended to reduce pain in a focused muscle area. A small needle is used to inject a mixture of numbing medication and steroids into the muscle. Trigger points are located throughout the body and are typically focus areas for muscle spasms, such as in the upper back or shoulder. 
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    Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Injections
    The sacroiliac is the largest joint in the body and inflammation can cause low back and buttock pain. An SI Joint Injection of numbing medicine and steroids can help relieve the pain.
  • Nerve Blocks
    What is it?
    A nerve block can be diagnostic, therapeutic, or both. As a diagnostic technique, it is often performed to determine if a specific nerve is the source of pain. As a technique to reduce pain, a nerve block involves injecting a mixture of pain killer andsteroids into or near the nerves.

    ­What should I expect?
    The procedure itself should take about 10 minutes. However, there can be preparations prior to the procedure including dressing into a gown and collecting vitals and pain levels. After the procedure, you may need a driver to ensure your safety. Our dedicated scheduling staff will provide you with everything you need to know in order to be prepared the day of.

    ­Where does it take place?

    The procedure conveniently takes place in our in-office procedure suite located inside Lexington Medical Park 3. However, if advanced anesthesia is required due to certain health conditions, we may schedule you at the Ambulatory Surgery Center in Lexington.

    ­Facet Joint Block
    Targets the facet joint, which can be on either side of your spine

    ­Medial Branch Block
    Targets the nerve that feeds the facet joint

    ­Occipital Nerve Block
    The occipital nerve is located at the base of the skull and inflammation of the surrounding tissues can cause significant pain and migraines. During this procedure, a small needle is used to inject a solution into the area around the nerves to prevent chronic cluster headaches or episodic migraines.

    ­Peripheral Nerve Block
    The peripheral nerves are those outside of the brain and spinal cord. Any disturbances in these nerves can cause numbness, tingling or a “pins and needles” feeling. A Peripheral Nerve Block can help relieve these symptoms.

    ­Sympathetic Nerve Block 
    The sympathetic nerves regulate part of the autonomic nervous system which controls involuntary functions such as sweating , blood flow, and some types of pain. Conditions causing chronic pain can be treated with a sympathetic nerve block
  • Radiofrequency Nerve Ablation (RFA)
    What is it?
    An ablation procedure is similar to an injection in that needles are used. However, instead of administering medication, the needle is hooked up to a generator that uses radio waves to ablate, or burn, the nerve endings which block the transmission of pain signals to the brain. This results in effective pain relief that usually lasts for six months up to a year. 

    ­What should I expect?
    The procedure itself should take about 10 minutes. However, there can be preparations prior to the procedure including dressing into a gown and collecting vitals and pain levels. After the procedure, you may need a driver to ensure your safety. Our dedicated scheduling staff will provide you with everything you need to know in order to be prepared the day of.

    ­Where does it take place?
    The procedure conveniently takes place in our in-office procedure suite located inside Lexington Medical Park 3. However, if advanced anesthesia is required due to certain health conditions, we may schedule you at the Ambulatory Surgery Center in Lexington.
  • Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS)
    A spinal cord stimulator delivers mild electrical stimulation to nerves along the spinal column, blocking nerve activity and preventing pain signals from reaching the brain without any medications. A temporary stimulator must be placed through a procedure done at our Ambulatory Surgery Center located in Lexington.

    Once the temporary stimulator is placed by one of our pain management physicians, our neurosurgery team will monitor results of the trial to determine if you are candidate for a permanent stimulator. If it is determined you are, then our dedicated staff will make arrangements for your permanent implant surgery.
  • BOTOX Injections
    BOTOX Injections are an effective and non-invasive method for treating tension, cluster, and/or chronic headaches and migraines. It is also used to prevent the recurrence of these episodes. During the procedure, the physician will determine where to inject the BOTOX which can include the muscles of the brow, eyes, forehead, side of the head, and back of the head.  These typically last about 3 months and can be repeated at that time if needed.

Diagnostic Services

To support our specialists in diagnosing and treating disorders of the brain and spine, our network of care offers extended hours and locations for convenient options for your imaging.


  • Advanced Imaging

    X-Ray


    Located on-site inside Lexington Brain and Spine Institute, Lexington Medical Park 3


    MRI


    Main Campus
    7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sunday - Saturday

    LMC Irmo
    7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
    8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday - Sunday

    LMC Lexington
    7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
    8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday – Sunday

    Lexington Medical Park 2 (located adjacent to Lexington Orthopaedics)
    8:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Monday - Thursday
    8:00 to 11:45 a.m. Friday

    Northeast Mobile
    8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday

    The Columbia Medical Group
    8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday - Thursday
    8:00 to 11:00 a.m. Friday

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    CT Scans


    Main Campus
    7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
    (Coming soon: 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sunday - Saturday)

    LMC Irmo
    7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
    9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Saturday

    LMC Lexington
    8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday – Friday

    Lexington Family Practice Ballentine
    8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday

    Lexington Family Practice Northeast
    8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday - Friday

    Lexington Family Practice West Columbia
    8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday - Friday

    Lexington Oncology
    8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday - Friday

    The Columbia Medical Group
    8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday - Thursday
    8:00 to 10:30 a.m. Friday


  • Ultrasound
    High frequency ultrasound probes are used to aid in the diagnosis of tendon, joint, soft tissue, and nerve injuries.
  • Electromyogram (EMG) and Nerve Conduction Study (NCS)
    An EMG is a diagnostic procedure that studies the signals between your nerves and muscles. It uses tiny needle electrodes to record electrical activity in the muscle. A nerve conduction study, often done simultaneously with an EMG, uses electrode stickers on the skin surface to measure the speed and strength of signals traveling between muscles. This procedure can help determine the source of pain, tingling, or numbness so it can be treated appropriately.

Physical Therapy

Conveniently located on the first floor of Lexington Medical Park 3, our dedicated Physical Therapy department supports patients of Lexington Brain and Spine Institute by offering comprehensive and individualized care. Whether pre-surgical or post-surgical, high-quality therapy is vital to decreasing pain and regaining function.

 

  • Dry Needling
    Dry needling is a highly effective treatment in resolving pain and muscle tension. The treatment involves inserting a small monofilament needle in the muscle and manipulating the needle to elicit an action potential.  This therapy can be used to decrease trigger points and muscle spasms, it can also be used to retrain damaged and less effective muscles.
  • Manual Therapy and Manipulation
    Manual therapy is a specialized form of physical therapy delivered by a therapist as opposed to a device or machine. Our highly-skilled physical therapists at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute have specific experience and training in manual therapy as well as manipulation of the spine. 
  • Electrical Stimulation (E-Stim)

    This is a broad category of modalities that includes treatments such as TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) and IFC (Interferential Current) as well as monophasic, biphasic, and Russian currents. E-Stim has been widely used to decrease pain, increase blood-flow, provide relaxation, and to retrain muscles.

  • Spinal Traction

    Spinal Traction or Spinal Decompression can be performed in our office on the cervical and lumbar spine as well as on peripheral joints. Traction is commonly used for degenerative discs, degenerative joints, bulging discs, as well as spasms and contractures to alleviate compression and decrease pain. The decompression provides a low load and pain-free stretch over a prolonged duration.

  • Cold Laser Therapy
    Cold Laser Therapy uses light waves to increase blood flow, decrease nerve irritability and decrease pain.